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The County of DuPage
Wheaton, Illinois

Press Release

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

State’s Attorney Berlin Finds Officers Justified in Bloomingdale Officer-Involved Shooting


“Every case involving the use of deadly force by a police officer must be carefully and thoroughly investigated. Such scrutiny is required to ensure the protection of the civil rights of those involved and to maintain the public’s confidence in law enforcement.

Following an extensive and thorough investigation conducted by the DuPage County Major Crimes Task Force regarding the shooting of Julius Glover, 26 (d.o.b. 2/3/1993) by Bloomingdale police officers, it is my determination that the officers, Levi McGhee, Phillip Jaffe and Jeremy Redic, who simultaneously discharged their weapons a cumulative total of seventeen times, striking Mr. Glover nine times, were justified in their actions and that no criminal charges will be filed against any of the officers. In reaching this conclusion, my staff and I carefully reviewed the applicable law and thoroughly examined all the evidence, including but not limited to:

• Police reports
• 9-1-1 calls
• Statements from those involved
• Witness accounts
• Physical evidence
• Photographs 
• Autopsy Report

On April 5, 2019, at approximately 6:45 p.m. Bloomingdale police officers responded to a call regarding a man with a knife at Walmart located on Army Trail Road. The man, later identified as Glover, stole a woman’s keys and when the woman demanded her keys back Glover put his hand in his pocket, moved closer to the woman and said “Do you know who the f--- I am? I am the f---ing anti-Christ.” When another shopper at the store confronted Glover, Glover responded by saying “Do you know who I am? Do you want to die today?”  Glover then walked to the back of the store where he was confronted by an AP host for Walmart at which time he pulled out a knife and told the man “I got my knife.” The man backed away at which time Glover fled the Walmart through an emergency exit door. As responding officers approached the Walmart, they were told by dispatch that Glover had fled the Walmart parking lot and that the incident was a now a possible robbery as Glover stole the keys to the car in which he was now driving. After a brief car chase, in which officers had their emergency lights and sirens activated, Glover pulled the vehicle over on Chippendale Lane just south of Mill Pond Drive in Glendale Heights, less than one mile away from the Walmart. Glover then got out of the stolen vehicle, a Lexus RX350, without being ordered to do so and stood outside the driver’s side door. At this time, one of the officers, all of whom were wearing police uniforms, ordered Glover to turn around and face away from him but Glover did not comply. Glover then reached inside the Lexus, then put his hands in his pockets and proceeded to walk away from the officers as he continued to disobey their orders. It was at this time that one of the officers noticed that Glover had a large knife in his hand. Officers Redic and Jaffe arrived at this time and observed other Bloomingdale police officers pointing their firearms at Glover. Both Redic and Jaffe were dressed in plain clothes and wearing outer vest carriers embroidered with a department badge with their names on the front. Officers Redic and Jaffe saw that Glover had a large knife in his hand and was refusing to obey the officers’ commands to drop the knife. At this time Officers Redic and Jaffe drew their firearms and joined the other officers in commanding Glover to drop the knife. Officer McGhee then arrived in a marked squad car with his K-9. Officer McGhee was wearing a police uniform with an outer vest that had police markings on it. Officer McGhee positioned himself with his K-9 in front of the other officers who were following Glover. Officer McGhee ordered Glover to drop the knife multiple times otherwise he would release the K-9. Glover laughed at McGhee and stated “I’ll kill that f---ing dog.” Officer Redic also heard Glover state, “f--- you, I’ll stab you and that dog.” The officers followed Glover as he walked down the street. As they were following him, Glover turned around and began walking at a quick pace toward Officer McGhee and the K-9 officer. McGhee had his duty firearm in his right hand and was holding his K-9 by his collar with his left hand. Officer Redic yelled for Glover to stop and get down on his knees, but Glover did not comply and continued towards Officer McGhee and the K-9 officer. McGhee ordered Glover to stop and again ordered him to drop the knife. Glover yelled “aaahhh” and ran into the street and began sprinting at Officer McGhee while pointing the knife toward Officer McGhee at shoulder height. Officer Jaffe observed Glover lunging toward McGhee with the knife in his hand. When Glover got to within five feet of Officer McGhee, Officers McGhee, Redic and Jaffe all discharged their duty weapons at Glover at the same time. They stopped shooting when Glover stopped moving towards them and fell to the ground. Officer McGhee, armed with a 9mm Glock 17 handgun, fired 6 times, Officer Jaffe, armed with a Sig Sauer P320 9mm handgun, fired 3 times and Officer Redic, armed with a .40 caliber Glock Model 22, fired 8 times. Once Glover fell to the ground Officer Redic called out “shots fired” over the radio and requested the Fire Department to respond to the scene. He then checked for signs of life and began chest compressions on Glover. Glendale Heights police officers arrived at the scene and took over CPR. Following the incident, the entire scene was processed by the DuPage County Sheriff’s Office. Through their work, investigators recovered a total of seventeen discharged cartridge cases near or under Glover’s body and a nearby driveway. Investigators also recovered a silver, 8.25” kitchen knife with a partially serrated blade on the driveway approximately six to ten feet away from Glover’s body. 
 
The above facts have been evaluated in the context of Illinois law governing the justifiable use of deadly force. In accordance with Illinois law, my staff and I have reviewed the facts and circumstances of the case with special consideration given to the perspective of the officers on the scene. It is important to remember that police officers are often forced to make split-second decisions about the appropriate amount of force necessary to bring a tense, uncertain and rapidly evolving situation under control.  
 
In determining whether the shooting of Julius Glover was justifiable, the fundamental question to be answered is whether the officers reasonably believed that Mr. Glover posed an imminent threat of death or great bodily harm to the officers on the scene or others. The law of the State of Illinois as it applies to the use of force in this matter is set forth in Use of force in defense of person (720 ILCS 5/7-1) and Peace officer’s use of force in making arrest (720 ILCS 5/7-5). Use of force in defense of person (720 ILCS 5/7-1) states “A person is justified in the use of force against another when and to the extent that he reasonably believes that such conduct is necessary to defend himself or another against such other’s imminent use of unlawful force. However, he is justified in the use of force which is intended or likely to cause death or great bodily harm only if he reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or another, or the commission of a forcible felony.” 

The Peace officer’s use of force in making arrest statute (720 ILCS 5/7-5) states that “a peace officer need not retreat or desist from efforts to make a lawful arrest.” Additionally, the Statute states that a peace officer “is justified in using force likely to cause death or great bodily harm only when he reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent death or great bodily harm to himself or such other person or when he reasonably believes that 1) Such force is necessary to prevent the arrest from being defeated by resistance or escape and 2) the person to be arrested has committed or attempted a forcible felony which involves the infliction or threatened infliction of great bodily harm, or is attempting to escape by use of a deadly weapon, or otherwise indicates that he will endanger human life or inflict great bodily harm unless arrested without delay.” 
 
Thus, the question becomes whether it was objectively reasonable for the officers to believe Mr. Glover posed an immediate threat of death or great bodily harm to themselves or others and was the use of force necessary to contain that threat. When Mr. Glover refused multiple clear and audible commands (corroborated by civilian witnesses) including “drop the knife”; “stop”; “put up your hands” and “don’t do it” from multiple police officers and instead charged at Officer McGhee while screaming and pointing a deadly weapon at Officer McGhee, the officers were confronted with an imminent unlawful threat of deadly force by Mr. Glover. Given his refusal to obey police commands and advance toward the officers while armed with a deadly weapon, the officers acted lawfully and were justified in using deadly force by discharging their weapons in order to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to themselves or others. Moreover, under Illinois law Officers McGhee, Jaffe, and Redic were not required to retreat or desist from efforts to make a lawful arrest because of Glover’s resistance to the arrest. Considering all the facts and circumstances, the officers’ belief that such force was necessary to prevent death or great bodily harm to themselves or another person was reasonable. Additionally, Glover had committed a previous forcible felony while at Walmart which involved the infliction or threatened infliction of great bodily harm. His attempt to escape by use of a deadly weapon coupled with his words and actions while at Walmart indicated that he would endanger human life or inflict great bodily harm unless arrested without delay. 
 
I would like to thank the DuPage County Major Crimes Task Force for conducting a thorough and independent investigation, as well as Assistant State’s Attorneys Mandy Meindl and Helen Kapas for their valuable assistance. 

In my opinion, the officers involved in this unfortunate incident made every attempt to reach a peaceful conclusion under very stressful conditions. Their concern for the safety and well-being of the residents in the neighborhood as well as their fellow officers is a testament to the excellent training that the Bloomingdale Police Department provides for their entire force. Unfortunately, Mr. Glover’s failure to obey the officers’ commands and his extremely aggressive and threatening behavior resulted in the officers discharging their weapons resulting in the death of Mr. Glover. Our sympathies, condolences and thoughts go out to the family of Julius Glover as they grieve the loss of a loved one.”